Risk and reproductive decisions british pakistani

Ethnicity and Health 3: The question then is whether couples feel the risk is worth taking. Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Journal of Genetic Counseling Having an affected child or children may significantly influence responses to risk information.

The focus should be on establishing risk, explaining the pattern of inheritance of an identified genetic condition and offering strategies for risk management.

In ascertaining consanguinity, genetic counsellors need to avoid stigmatising Pakistani and Bangladeshi patients on the basis of any presumed or actual consanguinity. Shaw A Negotiating Risk: Genetic counsellors need to be aware of the range of ideas that patients may bring to a genetics consultation without presuming that any particular set of ideas will apply in any given case.

In understanding health differentials, attempts have been made to dissociate the various factors commonly linked with ethnicity, such as socio-economic status, education level, language use, religion and cultural attitudes concerning gender and authority.

Shaw A Kinship, cultural preference and immigration: Reproductive choices are thus not necessarily static but can alter with experience. Risk responses were categorized as: British Pakistani Experiences of Genetics. The risks given vary with the inheritance of the condition and the clinical certainty of diagnosis.

In the case of autosomal recessive conditions, it is important to clarify the difference between being a carrier of a recessive condition and being affected by that condition. Condit CM Public attitudes and beliefs about genetics.

Key Concepts Parental consanguinity elevates the risk of autosomal recessive conditions. Genetics in Medicine, DOI: Pakistani Families in Britain.

I found that most couples were initially risk-takers who already had an unaffected child or children. Shaw A Drivers of cousin marriage among British Pakistanis. It concludes by addressing the broader question of whether couples of British Pakistani ethnicity are any more or less engaged than any other group in negotiating with modern medical genetic risk assessment and management.

Patients may not know that autosomal recessive conditions are caused by inheriting a mutation in the same gene from both parents — the mother and the father.

Responses were cross-referenced for associations with the severity of the condition, number of affected and unaffected children, availability of a prenatal test, age, gender, and migration history. The study highlights the diversity and dynamism of responses within one ethnic group and challenges stereotypes about cultural and religious responses to genetic risk.

I found that most couples were initially risk-takers who already had an unaffected child or children. Clarke A Introduction.

Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counselling

Fifteen cases were excluded, two because they concerned unmarried, childless adults, and thirteen because interview data were lacking or inadequate: Interviews were conducted with 62 adults in connection with these 51 cases, of which 32 were followed through two or more clinical consultations and 12 through more than one pregnancy.

Global Networks 6 4: Oxford and New York: Shaw A Kinship and Continuity: Journal of Genetic Counseling 17 4: Couples caring for living children with severe conditions were more likely to postpone.

Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples' responses to genetic counselling

Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 7: Archives of Disease in Childhood Patients may not appreciate the importance of establishing carrier status for managing risk for known autosomal recessive conditions in the family.

This paper examines the responses of 51 British Pakistani couples referred to a genetics clinic in southern England to counselling about recurrence risks for genetic problems in children.

Interviews were conducted with 62 adults in connection with these 51 cases, of which 32 were followed through two or more clinical consultations and 12 through more than one pregnancy.

These factors are not static markers of Bangladeshi or Pakistani ethnicity but vary within and between families, across generations and from one case to another.

Richards M Families, kinship and genetics. Couples caring for living children with severe conditions were more likely to postpone.

Risk and reproductive decisions:Request PDF on ResearchGate | 'I don't see any point in telling them': Attitudes to sharing genetic information in the family and carrier testing of relatives among British Pakistani adults.

Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counselling Alison Shaw Department of Public Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6HE, United Kingdom.

Professor Alison Shaw. Professor of Social Anthropology. Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counseling. Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counselling. Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counselling.

In the context of reproductive decisions, a numerical risk is a statement of uncertainty that, for couples, reduces to a binary: the child will have the condition, or it will not.

A. ShawNegotiating risk: British Pakistani experiences of. Abstract. How far does ethnicity/culture/religion mediate couples' responses to genetic risk? This paper examines the responses of 51 British Pakistani couples referred to a genetics clinic in southern England to counselling about recurrence risks for genetic problems in children.

Alison Shaw, Risk and reproductive decisions: British Pakistani couples’ responses to genetic counselling, Social Science & Medicine, 73, 1, (), (). Crossref.

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Risk and reproductive decisions british pakistani
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